Athlete Spotlight – Jordan Peacock achieves bowling perfection

BY SAM SCINTA
WEEKLY REPORTER
Jordan Peacock

Jordan Peacock

Jordan Peacock is a freshman on the O’Fallon Township High School JV Bowling Team, and he recently did something that no O’Fallon JV bowler had ever done.

He bowled a perfect 300 game in match play.

Peacock has an average left-handed approach. He takes a moment to gather himself at the line before taking four steps towards the foul-line and releasing a spinning ball with just the right amount of arc right into the pocket. Smash.

Except there is something about Jordan’s technique that is not so average for a left-hander. Jordan was born with a birth defect that has left him with a partial right arm, which extends mere inches below his shoulder.

Normal bowling technique requires your off hand to extend parallel to the floor with your shoulders square to your target, achieving the best balance. Jordan, however, must compensate differently, in a way most other bowlers would find difficult.

Yet he kept hitting his spots, over and over and over. Smash. Smash. Smash. 12 times, in fact, until the scoreboard read 300 and his teammates mobbed him on the lane.

The first 300 is a special moment for any bowler, especially when it happens during a game that actually counts. But for Jordan Peacock, this 300 means maybe just a bit more.

Jordan’s father, Tony, was a beloved bowling coach at St. Clair Bowl, working with Saturday morning youth and travel leagues, as well as helping Head Coaches Mike Imes and Garrett Spencer with the O’Fallon Bowling program.

Tony had taught both Jordan and his older brother Justin how to bowl from a young age, and both bowlers showed the signs of having a coach for a father on the lanes.

Both were targeted by Imes early on as potential bowlers for his high school teams, and it is a direct result of the hard work they put in alongside their father.

Then, on April 16, Tony collapsed from a stroke and struck his head. He was rushed to the hospital, but never woke up. He died, nine days later, on Jordan’s fourteenth birthday.

“It was tough on all of us,” Justin Peacock said. “But Jordan took it particularly hard. This moment for him is a big part of the healing, because he knew Dad was there with him.”

Tony himself never rolled a perfect game, although he had come close with some 299 scores in the past.

Video of Jordan’s accomplishment have gone viral on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, but he is already focused on rolling the next perfect game. Hopefully, this is the first of many for the promising freshman en route to a groundbreaking career.

“I know Dad is proud of him,” Justin added. “We all are.”

As his dad would say, he lets the ball do the work.